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Are you passionate about open-source robotics? Join us.

Ubuntu is a very popular operating system for robotics, for a number of reasons. Perhaps the software stack one happens to use prefers Ubuntu, or the hardware one is using only distributes drivers for Ubuntu. Maybe one’s team is already familiar with it, or decision-makers like that it has long-term support releases and extended security maintenance. Perhaps one views snaps as the perfect way to support and update robots in the field, and so on....

February 22, 2019 · 2 min · Kyle
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Develop your snaps faster

Snaps bundle their dependencies, which take time to fetch and unpack, and they’re typically made up of multiple parts, each of which need to be built and installed into the snap. Once you finish this process, you need to install the snap and test it out. Once you notice that your code is terrible and doesn’t work the way you thought, you have to make a change and go back through that process again....

October 25, 2018 · 5 min · Kyle

ROS Melodic on Fedora 27

Part of the snapcraft CLI’s development roadmap this cycle includes the ability to build snaps on distros other than Ubuntu. Part of that work includes investigating each plugin to determine if it’s possible to get it working on other distros. As a result, I’ve been looking into the Catkin plugin recently, using Fedora 27 as my proving ground (since that’s the distro with which I’m most familiar after Ubuntu). The first thing you’ll notice trying to get ROS working on Fedora is that, unlike Ubuntu, where Open Robotics maintains infrastructure hosting a repository of Debian packages, there is no repository for you to use: you must build ROS from source....

May 25, 2018 · 2 min · Kyle
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Your first robot: Sharing with others [5/5]

UPDATE: I’m leaving this series up for historical purposes, but please note that I no longer recommend Ubuntu Core or snaps for use in robotics. This is the fifth (and final) blog post in this series about creating your first robot with ROS and Ubuntu Core. In the previous post we discussed methods of control, did a little math, and wrote the ROS driver for our robot. But it still required several nodes to be running at once, and sharing it with the world involved uploading your source code somewhere and convincing people to install ROS, build your package, and use it....

March 16, 2018 · 14 min · Kyle
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Your first robot: The driver [4/5]

UPDATE: I’m leaving this series up for historical purposes, but please note that I no longer recommend Ubuntu Core or snaps for use in robotics. This is the fourth blog post in this series about creating your first robot with ROS and Ubuntu Core. In the previous post we worked on getting data out of the wireless controller and into ROS in a format meant for controlling differential drive robots like ours: the Twist message....

March 9, 2018 · 18 min · Kyle